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The "Headlock" Greatest Move Ever!

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Category: District 1
Forum Name: District 1 Discussion
Forum Description: Talk about anything related to PIAA District 1 high school wrestling.
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Printed Date: Nov 24 2017 at 4:18am


Topic: The "Headlock" Greatest Move Ever!
Posted By: DSSR
Subject: The "Headlock" Greatest Move Ever!
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 6:27am
Perhaps the most exciting move in wrestling!
Why is it loved by some - hated by others and should it be taught to all young wrestlers? If not, why not?


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just an average wrestling fan
Don Smith Sr
Family First!



Replies:
Posted By: jonnyquest
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 6:48am
I think it is cheating. lol! I agree it is a powerful and effective hold. Anything that can result in a fall is great. I think people take a negative look at it during youth wrestling. When a youngster learns to headlock sometimes they forget about fundamentals and are always looking to headlock. Shane Springer sometimes took the ridiculous criticism about his headlocks being junk move. Shane would say if you practice it , then it's not junk. Shane should probably make an instructional dvd because he can hit it from any position. DSSR btw I like the idea about push out rule in scholastic wrestling, the best change I have heard in a while.


Posted By: BarEmUp
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 7:11am
I think it should be taught.  I think it is a move that you can live and die by it,  but I will say that it was shown to any new novice group that I have taught in the first 2 weeks.  For a young novice wrestler it is a position they tend to get into very often.  It is a move that can give that wrestler instant success if taught.  I used it to keep their interest while teaching them a more fundemental high percentage way to wrestle. Then ween them off of it.   


Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 7:24am
At a minimum young wrestlers need to learn how to counter it anyway.. So you need to teach the position. Same for the chin/underhook mixer.. etc. Unfortantely for many little kids new to the sport (and parents) they want instant success. Teaching fundamentals usually results in more lasting success down the road...
 
With that said, there are some wrestlers (shane for example, mark smith before him) that were just good from this position. Even when people knew it was coming. It's like anything else.. if you are effecient at something even when your opponent knows its coming. It doesn't really matter if its  a single, double, shrug or anything else.


Posted By: DSSR
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 7:46am
Originally posted by jonnyquest jonnyquest wrote:

I think it is cheating. lol! I agree it is a powerful and effective hold. Anything that can result in a fall is great. I think people take a negative look at it during youth wrestling. When a youngster learns to headlock sometimes they forget about fundamentals and are always looking to headlock. Shane Springer sometimes took the ridiculous criticism about his headlocks being junk move. Shane would say if you practice it , then it's not junk. Shane should probably make an instructional dvd because he can hit it from any position. DSSR btw I like the idea about push out rule in scholastic wrestling, the best change I have heard in a while.
 Many that have been pinned by the headlock wish it was cheating! Real sour grapes!

I have watched Shane Springer since he was a freshman and he's a high quality wrestler that any and every team would want. His style reminds me of front head and arm Dave Schultz styleHe can headlock you from almost any position, good wrestler know that and still fall victim to it.... it's unstoppable (so far 127 times unstoppable). By the way congratulations to Shane for breaking the pin record and good luck to you in college. Also it's great to see you and your brother at Norristown your senior year making unforgettable memories and Gold sounds good to me.

Not all changes are good as we can see with the weight class changes but I think the push out rule would help the sport in many ways.



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just an average wrestling fan
Don Smith Sr
Family First!


Posted By: NAHS78
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 7:51am
Shane has no problem demonstrating his headlock, he has done so on many occasions over the years during our off season programs. However, just because Shane can do it doesn't mean most others will be able to do so.

My son isn't a bad wrestler and Shane has worked with him on the headlock, but my kid and just about everyone else can't seem to hit it the way Shane does it. Shane has freakish skills. As my kid would say after another scramble gone wrong, "Springer has hips from God."



Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 7:58am
Originally posted by NAHS78 NAHS78 wrote:

Shane has no problem demonstrating his headlock, he has done so on many occasions over the years during our off season programs. However, just because Shane can do it doesn't mean most others will be able to do so.

My son isn't a bad wrestler and Shane has worked with him on the headlock, but my kid and just about everyone else can't seem to hit it the way Shane does it. Shane has freakish skills. As my kid would say after another scramble gone wrong, "Springer has hips from God."

lol.. He's hilarious.. Monday night I watched him "bait" his opponent by lowering his hips.. Just has the guy tried to cross over his hips.. BAM.. good night..lol It was actually comical..
 
When the kids were little we would toss them in with shane even if they were older because if you wanted to learn how to control your hips.. Shane was the kid to wrestle..lol Shane didn't want to score points.. He just wanted to PIN you..lol It didn't matter if it was out on the mat. On the gym floor.. over by the water fountain. These kids would still be wrestling up against the walls. It was crazy..


Posted By: oldcougar
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 8:50am
I like the headlock, but not as a primary move.

The problem with Shane Springer's headlock, imo, is that he forces it too much.  Now he's got like 130 pins, so he must be doing something right.  And I saw him pin himself to the state finals as a sophomore.  But I question the efficacy of his headlock at the next level. (read College).

IMO, the headlock should be a part of a wrestler's bag of tricks - there when you need it or when the opportunity presents itself. 

But if you plan to wrestle Division 1 at the college level, it ain't happening if a headlock is your go-to move.  Yes, you will still get a lot of pins, but the real studs just won't let it happen to them.

Mark Smith was a legend among Upper Perk fans when he was headlocking everyone.  He was returning Region champ as a Junior when he ran into an Upper Darby wrestler who knew how to counter a headlock.  Seems to me that year, Smith didn't qualify for states.  That stuck between two years as regional champ. 

Shane is a beast and he can force his will on a lot of people.  I'd love to see him run through the state tournament like grease through a goose.  But if he runs into someone who can stop his headlock, I hope he can fall back on other moves that work just as well.





Posted By: CJJ189
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 8:52am
Dustin Tancredi was a pretty avid user of the headlock too wasn't he? He was pretty big in high school and a monster now at WCU, I wouldn't want to be caught in that....might put you right to sleep. Springer also has a very solid headlock and I can see some similarities between the two


Posted By: aiso65
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 8:55am
Upper Perk wrestlers (youth and middle school) are still throwing the headlock from every imaginable position.  They're good at it... my son (8th grade) said the headlock is a crappy move and he would never use it.  Two weeks ago he got caught by a scrub wrestler and pinned in :27 with it... he's starting to question how crappy a move it is. 


Posted By: oldcougar
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:05am
Anyone who watched the Lehigh-Penn State match last year witnessed one of the greatest headlocks of all time.  I've never seen a better one.

Andrew Alton went in for a duck under, and midway through the move he transitioned to a headlock.  The Lehigh kid was flat before he knew what happened.

Totally awesome.


And Quentin Wright still uses the headlock quite regularly.  Didn't he deck the kid from Iowa with it?  Think so, but my memory fails me.

The headlock can work in college, but it can't stand alone.



Posted By: DSSR
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:46am
Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

Anyone who watched the Lehigh-Penn State match last year witnessed one of the greatest headlocks of all time.  I've never seen a better one.

Andrew Alton went in for a duck under, and midway through the move he transitioned to a headlock.  The Lehigh kid was flat before he knew what happened.

Totally awesome.


And Quentin Wright still uses the headlock quite regularly.  Didn't he deck the kid from Iowa with it?  Think so, but my memory fails me.

The headlock can work in college, but it can't stand alone.

http://www.flowrestling.org/coverage/237840-Penn-St-vs-Lehigh/video/366176-141-lbs-match-Andrew-Alton-vs-Stephen-Dutton" rel="nofollow - http://www.flowrestling.org/coverage/237840-Penn-St-vs-Lehigh/video/366176-141-lbs-match-Andrew-Alton-vs-Stephen-Dutton
I agree totally awesome!


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just an average wrestling fan
Don Smith Sr
Family First!


Posted By: nesc333
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:59am
Our coach shows the left handed headlock. seldom used but can be quite effective in the right situation. That is what Quinten Wright used to pin the kid from IOWA.


Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 10:04am
Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

Anyone who watched the Lehigh-Penn State match last year witnessed one of the greatest headlocks of all time.  I've never seen a better one.

Andrew Alton went in for a duck under, and midway through the move he transitioned to a headlock.  The Lehigh kid was flat before he knew what happened.

Totally awesome.


And Quentin Wright still uses the headlock quite regularly.  Didn't he deck the kid from Iowa with it?  Think so, but my memory fails me.

The headlock can work in college, but it can't stand alone.

And let us not forget Rhone's Mixer in the NCAA finals.. Not a headlock but a similar "big move".. Some wrestlers are effective at these moves.. Especially in a flurry situation. In the Alton case. It just was a natural 2nd move off the duck.
 
Speaking of Wright. I just watched his match against nebraska where he launched the guy in the first period with kind of a lateral drop. He does throw quite a bit at the D1 level..
 


Posted By: Bill Rudick
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 10:32am
I am definitely a fan of the headlock, and used it regularly, both left and right-handed.  The reason some people think it's a "junk" move is because too many kids never learn to do it right because they never had to--they got youth level pins with crappy versions. 

I also think that it is only truly effective if you are good enough with other aspects of your wrestling to more or less "keep it in your back pocket" only to break it out when least expected.  But when done properly, it can be a killer move.

As far as not working at the highest levels, Caldwell used it for a takedown against Metcalf, and it is certainly still used at the Olympic level. 


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www.rudickimages.photoreflect.com


Posted By: atrain31
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 11:28am
Shane Smith pinned Wright with a headlock last year or 2 years ago. It's on youtube. Marky and Sheetz threw a lefty and Shane threw it righty. I'm right handed and naturally throw a lefty headlock. IMO, controlling the opponents upper arm with your dominant hand is more important than having your dominant hand go around the head.


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Is this a real forum?


Posted By: Bill Rudick
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 11:38am
atrain--of top importance is hips, then the hand/opponents arm NOT around the head.  The actual headlock around  is really nothing more than a guide when done right. Well, until he's on his back anyway.

I was at the Wilkes Open when Shane hit Wright.  It would have been a "five" in freestyle.  Quite beautiful.


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www.rudickimages.photoreflect.com


Posted By: oldcougar
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 12:03pm
When I was a youth coach, I had a seven year old who had a killer headlock.  He pinned everyone with it - both at six and seven years old. 

Coming off the mat after yet another 1st period headlock pin, I pulled him aside and told him I wanted him to start using other moves; that eventually he'd run into someone that could block his headlock and he needed to use different moves.

My intent was for him to use the headlock less often.  Instead, as far as I know he never used another headlock - and I coached him for 9 years and then watched most of his high school bouts. 

He won Eastern Nationals at 7 and placed 3rd in the state in high school - without ever using another headlock.

Now there was a kid who listened to his coach.



Posted By: East140
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 2:02pm
Originally posted by Bill Rudick Bill Rudick wrote:

atrain--of top importance is hips, then the hand/opponents arm NOT around the head.  The actual headlock around  is really nothing more than a guide when done right. Well, until he's on his back anyway.

I was at the Wilkes Open when Shane hit Wright.  It would have been a "five" in freestyle.  Quite beautiful.


I mean I'm not a freestyle ref but this doesn't look like 5 to me....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXzXZpsBMrM" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXzXZpsBMrM


Posted By: Clarkspring
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 2:16pm
Cougar, when that Alton video came out, I must have watched it 50 times.  The Lehigh wrestler tries to back out of the duck and leaves himself unbalanced and vulnerable to Alton's hips.  Absolutely genius setup.
As per using the headlock on the division one level, Mark Smith didn't light the NCAA world on fire exactly, but he was able to get 99 wins for ESU with little more than his high school headlock.



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"Obviously you're not a golfer."


Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 2:44pm
Originally posted by East140 East140 wrote:

Originally posted by Bill Rudick Bill Rudick wrote:

atrain--of top importance is hips, then the hand/opponents arm NOT around the head.  The actual headlock around  is really nothing more than a guide when done right. Well, until he's on his back anyway.

I was at the Wilkes Open when Shane hit Wright.  It would have been a "five" in freestyle.  Quite beautiful.


I mean I'm not a freestyle ref but this doesn't look like 5 to me....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXzXZpsBMrM" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXzXZpsBMrM
Im not sure he would even get 3.. lol I dont think he took him feet to back.. Looked like he just sagged into it.. Still.. a pin is a pin is a pin..lol


Posted By: oldcougar
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 3:21pm
Clark:

as I mentioned above, for guys like Smith (and Springer??), the headlock will work on plenty of kids in college.  But using it as your lead move will not work against the guys you really want to beat.
Your choices: be a headhunter and score a lot of dual meet points, but fizzle out when you get on the big stage -or- keep the headlock as one of many moves and become a complete wrestler that can go to the next level.

I really think it is as cut and dried as that.



Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 3:28pm
Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

Clark:

as I mentioned above, for guys like Smith (and Springer??), the headlock will work on plenty of kids in college.  But using it as your lead move will not work against the guys you really want to beat.
Your choices: be a headhunter and score a lot of dual meet points, but fizzle out when you get on the big stage -or- keep the headlock as one of many moves and become a complete wrestler that can go to the next level.

I really think it is as cut and dried as that.

Agreed.. QW is a NC.. on track to possibly repeat.. for example..
 
While we are talking about the next level.. The ability to ride and as a collary not get ridden out is EXTREMELY important.


Posted By: DB211
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 4:10pm
Tim Riley has as nasty of a headlock as anyone and he's found a good deal of success with it. I agree that there needs to be more to your repitoire than just a headlock, but it can get you a long way.


Posted By: 3lb3lb3
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 5:20pm
i went to high school with a kid that only got pinned once in his entire career in HS and College.  It was by headlock.  He got hornswoggled by smith from Upper Perk.  His name now hangs with the rest of the victums at the UP gym. 


Posted By: CombatxSpeed
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 6:21pm
headlock is a great move because its what i like to call an equalizer... it can come out of nowhere and ended a match immediately regardless of the score... a wrestler with a nice headlock is always a threat ti win.. people hate it cuz they dont know the fact that a kid who is losing by 10 points can beat someone out of nowhere...


Posted By: oldcougar
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 6:30pm
people don't 'hate it' as you said.  As a coach I tried to steer my kids away from depending on one move, regardless of what move it is.  The problem with the headlock is that it makes everything too easy.  A physical kid can overpower kids with less physicality with a headlock.

The problem is: physicality is relative.  Other kids grow up and grow stronger.  And further up the line there is always someone stronger, no matter how strong you are.  And the better the kid is you are wrestling, the more likely he can counter the headlock that is forced.

It is the kid who depends on the headlock that usually goes by the wayside.  No one will say that Mark Smith didn't have a great career.  But I will say that his dependence on the headlock limited that career to a point that he just couldn't get past.




Posted By: Superman
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 7:06pm
The main thing a headlock can teach is the importance and use of hips. If your are a good headlocker then it can help you in top and bottom as well. When on bottom you may get a Peppleman or anyone from CD that loves to tilt. A headlocker that knows how to use his hips is less likely to get caught in a tilt because tilts are about controlling hips. Same thing with legs. One thing everyone should agree on is that hips is key to wrestling. And a headlock teaches how to use and master your hips.


Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 8:45pm
Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

people don't 'hate it' as you said.  As a coach I tried to steer my kids away from depending on one move, regardless of what move it is.  The problem with the headlock is that it makes everything too easy.  A physical kid can overpower kids with less physicality with a headlock.

The problem is: physicality is relative.  Other kids grow up and grow stronger.  And further up the line there is always someone stronger, no matter how strong you are.  And the better the kid is you are wrestling, the more likely he can counter the headlock that is forced.

It is the kid who depends on the headlock that usually goes by the wayside.  No one will say that Mark Smith didn't have a great career.  But I will say that his dependence on the headlock limited that career to a point that he just couldn't get past.


Although I "generally" agree with you.. I don't agree with the statement regarding "relying on one move".. If it were a good single leg or high C we were talking about you "may" not make that statement.. And this convo may not even be ongoing..lol Wrestlers that perfect their style and have certain techniques that they are effective at.. People KNOW its coming and still can't stop it.  I guess if you are efficient at something it shouldn't matter what the technique is.
 
I don't recall any threads regarding someone relying on a sweep single..lol I guess we should take it for what it is. Some kids are just that good at certain things and others good at other techniques..
 
 


Posted By: oldcougar
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 8:53pm
SixStringer (I've got a TwelveStringer myself) -
   My old coach used to tell us that if we had three moves we could be state champs - as long as we threw those three moves better than anyone else.  In fact I knew a guy who won states with only two moves, really: An unstoppable snap-down takedown and a brutal tight waist.  He was a lousy pinner but he was a state champ.

This, discussion, is about the headlock.  I just don't think a move that can mostly be blocked by a competent opponent should be the move you hang your hat on. 

It's as simple as that.


Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:03pm
Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

SixStringer (I've got a TwelveStringer myself) -
   My old coach used to tell us that if we had three moves we could be state champs - as long as we threw those three moves better than anyone else.  In fact I knew a guy who won states with only two moves, really: An unstoppable snap-down takedown and a brutal tight waist.  He was a lousy pinner but he was a state champ.

This, discussion, is about the headlock.  I just don't think a move that can mostly be blocked by a competent opponent should be the move you hang your hat on. 

It's as simple as that.
I need to pick up a 12 string for some songs.. lol
 
Again I would agree with you for MOST wrestlers.. But there are a few (like Springer) that make it work for them. I personally taught other techniques myself.. and my son was certainly not a headlocker.. lol
 
I had an assistant coach in college that was just a crazy defensive wrestler from his feet.. That was his thing. He would quite literally give you his leg... and he would always say. "You may have my leg.. But I have both your arms.."..lol Pretty much just as he launched you to your back.. Was it high percentage for the majority of wrestlers? um.. no. Did he pummel most everyone.. um.. yeah.. lol
 


Posted By: atrain31
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:10pm
Originally posted by 3lb3lb3 3lb3lb3 wrote:

i went to high school with a kid that only got pinned once in his entire career in HS and College.  It was by headlock.  He got hornswoggled by smith from Upper Perk.  His name now hangs with the rest of the victums at the UP gym. 


What was the victim's name? There are several state champs and all Americans on that board. My favorite Mark Smith pin was against Fryling. Was it him? He bumped up from 140 to 152 for that one.

Cliff Clavon little known fact - When Shane pinned Wright, that gave all 3 Smith's (2 brothers, 1 cousin) a win over a future NCAA champ. Mark pinned Jake Herbert, Devon beat Jarrod King by head locking him over and over to squeak out a one point win, and Shane pinned Wright.

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Is this a real forum?


Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:25pm
Originally posted by atrain31 atrain31 wrote:

Originally posted by 3lb3lb3 3lb3lb3 wrote:

i went to high school with a kid that only got pinned once in his entire career in HS and College.  It was by headlock.  He got hornswoggled by smith from Upper Perk.  His name now hangs with the rest of the victums at the UP gym. 


What was the victim's name? There are several state champs and all Americans on that board. My favorite Mark Smith pin was against Fryling. Was it him? He bumped up from 140 to 152 for that one.

Cliff Clavon little known fact - When Shane pinned Wright, that gave all 3 Smith's (2 brothers, 1 cousin) a win over a future NCAA champ. Mark pinned Jake Herbert, Devon beat Jarrod King by head locking him over and over to squeak out a one point win, and Shane pinned Wright.
That's kind of a dubious honor..lol But interesting.. ;)
 
I remember the Smith/Fryling match....


Posted By: oldcougar
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:25pm
Originally posted by SixStringer SixStringer wrote:

Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

SixStringer (I've got a TwelveStringer myself) -
   My old coach used to tell us that if we had three moves we could be state champs - as long as we threw those three moves better than anyone else.  In fact I knew a guy who won states with only two moves, really: An unstoppable snap-down takedown and a brutal tight waist.  He was a lousy pinner but he was a state champ.

This, discussion, is about the headlock.  I just don't think a move that can mostly be blocked by a competent opponent should be the move you hang your hat on. 

It's as simple as that.
I need to pick up a 12 string for some songs.. lol
 
Again I would agree with you for MOST wrestlers.. But there are a few (like Springer) that make it work for them. I personally taught other techniques myself.. and my son was certainly not a headlocker.. lol
 
I had an assistant coach in college that was just a crazy defensive wrestler from his feet.. That was his thing. He would quite literally give you his leg... and he would always say. "You may have my leg.. But I have both your arms.."..lol Pretty much just as he launched you to your back.. Was it high percentage for the majority of wrestlers? um.. no. Did he pummel most everyone.. um.. yeah.. lol
 

I saw two of his headlocks on Friday night.  Both of them were pretty darn chancy, imo.  He really gets into a mano-a-mano confrontation with it and dares his opponent to out-muscle him.  Now he is a beast and way stronger than the kids he was wrestling.  But one of them (I forget which so don't ask) almost came out on top in one of those head-to-head struggles.  Yes, Shane ended up on top, and the other kid was pinned.  But there was a moment when the other kid could have ended up on top.  Had he been stronger or with better balance, he may well have done it.

My point:  That kind of 'forced' takedown - walking right up to the opponent, grabbing the head and trying to force him to his back - won't work well at the college level, imo.  Points are scored in transition, with movement and speed.  That overpowering stuff won't work nearly as well because guess what:  the other guys are beasts, too.

 


Posted By: SixStringer
Date Posted: Feb 07 2012 at 9:35pm
Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

Originally posted by SixStringer SixStringer wrote:

Originally posted by oldcougar oldcougar wrote:

SixStringer (I've got a TwelveStringer myself) -
   My old coach used to tell us that if we had three moves we could be state champs - as long as we threw those three moves better than anyone else.  In fact I knew a guy who won states with only two moves, really: An unstoppable snap-down takedown and a brutal tight waist.  He was a lousy pinner but he was a state champ.

This, discussion, is about the headlock.  I just don't think a move that can mostly be blocked by a competent opponent should be the move you hang your hat on. 

It's as simple as that.
I need to pick up a 12 string for some songs.. lol
 
Again I would agree with you for MOST wrestlers.. But there are a few (like Springer) that make it work for them. I personally taught other techniques myself.. and my son was certainly not a headlocker.. lol
 
I had an assistant coach in college that was just a crazy defensive wrestler from his feet.. That was his thing. He would quite literally give you his leg... and he would always say. "You may have my leg.. But I have both your arms.."..lol Pretty much just as he launched you to your back.. Was it high percentage for the majority of wrestlers? um.. no. Did he pummel most everyone.. um.. yeah.. lol
 

I saw two of his headlocks on Friday night.  Both of them were pretty darn chancy, imo.  He really gets into a mano-a-mano confrontation with it and dares his opponent to out-muscle him.  Now he is a beast and way stronger than the kids he was wrestling.  But one of them (I forget which so don't ask) almost came out on top in one of those head-to-head struggles.  Yes, Shane ended up on top, and the other kid was pinned.  But there was a moment when the other kid could have ended up on top.  Had he been stronger or with better balance, he may well have done it.

My point:  That kind of 'forced' takedown - walking right up to the opponent, grabbing the head and trying to force him to his back - won't work well at the college level, imo.  Points are scored in transition, with movement and speed.  That overpowering stuff won't work nearly as well because guess what:  the other guys are beasts, too.

 
Again I don't disagree with you.. But I'll let you think about this.. WHen shane was a little kid everyone thought his headlocks and chin whips wouldn't work at the next level (i.e., HS).. Here we are 129 (and counting) pins later and it seems to be working "for him", including a state final (seemed to spook Alton a little bit). Who really knows if he will find success at the next level. He very well may adjust his style.. but he will ALWAYS be dangerous. He just has freaky hips.
 


Posted By: DSSR
Date Posted: Feb 08 2012 at 5:29am


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just an average wrestling fan
Don Smith Sr
Family First!


Posted By: DSSR
Date Posted: Feb 08 2012 at 6:19am
This is why I bring up the subject of The Headlock. 2 very knowledgeable wrestling coaches, fans / fanatics seem to think differently about the headlock and it's use. It is most definitely a great equalizer and most definitely will get a quiet gym standing whether the fans are knowledgeable or Big ten wrestling commentators.   I think it's a wrestling fan favorite. 
In my brief wrestling career I remember our junior high coach (was an awesome coach) who showed us the basic moves and made a point to tell us  how some moves come almost natural to some while awkward to others and no 2 wrestlers are the same. He called it explosive execution and preached it daily. One of his favorite lines was." things become second nature after you have done them 100,000 times and not before". He also loved the headlock and so did most of our team. As a team we were undefeated 7th and 8th grades crushing most teams and getting mentioned in a national wrestling magazine, it was a big deal for all involved. Our gym was packed for every home dual meet even the faculty would come watch.
Then came high school the next year with a new stern coach who although he never wrestled new everything there was to about the sport. He was very dry and hard to get to know unlike our previous coach. HE HATED THE HEADLOCK! In his words it was; junk, crap, only a pee wee wrestling move, junior high move doesn't work in high school. I remember quite clearly the first wrestling meeting in high school, his exact quote,"forget the headlock we don't use that here". Most my ninth grade class just looked at each other in disgust. Went from a great coach to one who lived in HIS own box and don't dare go outside HIS box. Most of the team ended leaving the sport they loved for other sports including me. 
I have been a wrestling fan since and love the HEADLOCK it's a great move but it can't be your only move just part of your arsenal especially at the college level!
Coaches keep it fun it's not about you it's all about the wrestlers.


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just an average wrestling fan
Don Smith Sr
Family First!


Posted By: fishwrestler7
Date Posted: Feb 08 2012 at 7:19am
oc springer didnt hit 2 headlocks on friday his fist pin was an inside trip for the fall, which is what i think your talking about, the other was a beautiful headlock one of the best i have ever seen. I have watched shane most of this year and he has really backed down from his headlock. If it is there he hits it but usually he works other things on his feet. I agree that the headlock cannot be a primary move in college but it still does work so just drop the subject. Everyone knows now that you think it doesnt work against higher level competition and do not recommend it for constant use


Posted By: Bill Rudick
Date Posted: Feb 08 2012 at 10:16am
Originally posted by East140 East140 wrote:

Originally posted by Bill Rudick Bill Rudick wrote:

atrain--of top importance is hips, then the hand/opponents arm NOT around the head.  The actual headlock around  is really nothing more than a guide when done right. Well, until he's on his back anyway.

I was at the Wilkes Open when Shane hit Wright.  It would have been a "five" in freestyle.  Quite beautiful.


I mean I'm not a freestyle ref but this doesn't look like 5 to me....
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXzXZpsBMrM" rel="nofollow - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXzXZpsBMrM


Oh, definitely not. Guess ones memory can't be trusted sometimes...especially when you get older.  :-) Maybe it was the sight of a headlocker getting caught in one...people good at the headlock don't often get headlocked.

But,  it would be a three. 


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www.rudickimages.photoreflect.com


Posted By: CZH2016
Date Posted: Feb 08 2012 at 12:29pm
this past summer my son went to Penn States wrestling camp for a week.  He worked with Dylan and Andrew Alton, and his famous headlock is called the super Duck!!  Just a simple duck under leading up to a monster headlock.  My son has more than doubled his wins this year from last year, and also his pins.  Im a believer!!


Posted By: upwrestler14
Date Posted: Feb 08 2012 at 1:20pm
That's a duck under to a headlock this is a super duck.  http://youtu.be/3ORoo6xMQcg" rel="nofollow - http://youtu.be/3ORoo6xMQcg



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